Their Names Will Not Be Forgotten: Dartmouth’s War Memorials

The markers to Dartmouth’s veterans stand in silent tribute to their sacrifice. From the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and other conflicts, they are remembered with plaques, statues, and spaces for reflection. This history is recorded in the book The Hill Winds Know Their Name: A Guide to Dartmouth’s War Memorials, by Charles Wood. Visit a map of each memorial (PDF).

Photos
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Tribute from class of 1910 to their classmates who died in service.
A tribute from members of the Class of 1910 to their classmates who died in service; the memorial is located in Memorial Field stadium. (Photo by Keono Ocalvey ’20, Th ’21)
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Sculpture called "And the Hill Winds Know Their Name" from 2015.
A monument at Memorial Field called The Hill Wind Knows Their Name, by the artist Dimitri Gerakaris ’69, is inscribed to “all the men and women of Dartmouth who have served their country in war and peace,” from the members of the Sphinx, a senior society established at Dartmouth in 1885. (Photo by Keono Ocalvey ’20, Th ’21)
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A wall of several memorial plaques
Many plaques and monuments from around campus were restored and moved to Memorial Field in 2015. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Granite marker listing alumni who died in World War II
“A Record of Their Fame” at Memorial Field lists the names of the 310 Dartmouth alumni who died in World War II. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Granite engraved 'Hill Winds'marker
An inscribed granite wall monument is central to the array of remembrances at Memorial Field. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Civil War Tribute plaque
A plaque unveiled in November 1923, inscribed with a tribute from the surviving veterans of the Civil War to the Dartmouth veterans who served in World War I, was moved to Memorial Field in 2015. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Bronze bas-relief
A large bronze bas-relief on the south wall of the basement entrance to Dartmouth Library’s Baker-Berry Library honors Richard Nelville Hall, Class of 1915, who was Dartmouth’s first fatality in World War I. The work was a gift of Edward Tuck, Class of 1862. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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A 1912 remembrance letter
A letter from the Class of 1912, displayed at the basement entrance to Dartmouth Library’s Baker-Berry Library, was written as part of the successful campaign by the class to raise $600 to endow a Red Cross hospital bed in memory of Howard “Rainy” Lines, Class of 1912, who died in France in 1912. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Two large plaques inside the entrance to Dartmouth Library’s Rauner Special Collections Library honor Dartmouth men who fought in the Civil War.
Two large plaques inside the entrance to Dartmouth Library’s Rauner Special Collections Library honor Dartmouth men who fought in the Civil War. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Bronze sculpture of a female figure
The sculpture above the Class of 1943 reflecting pool stands in the center of the Zahm Courtyard beside the Hopkins Center for the Arts. Dartmouth memorials for World War II, Korea, and Vietnam are displayed in the courtyard. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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Vietnam memorial statue
Dartmouth’s Vietnam memorial, first conceived as a senior class project by Theodore Arnold ’78, was originally housed in Collis Center. It was later moved to the Zahm Courtyard to make it more accessible. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)
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William S. Smoyer memorial is a plaque and large painting
One of only five war memorials to an individual at Dartmouth, the memorial in the Smoyer lounge in Thompson Arena honors the memory of William Smoyer ’67, who was killed in Vietnam two weeks after his arrival there as a Marine lieutenant. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)